The Journey of the Form by Pat Gorman, M.Ac. ~ (Nov 2021)

Introduction by Margaret Olmsted

Pat Gorman wrote this article for the Tai Chi Press, Vol. II, No. IV. In that version, she left out a paragraph she had written elsewhere about Repulse Monkey and a line about Four Corners which I have included here.

Each time you take a journey through the form it can be different, from completely missing the journey to having the best tai chi round ever. Sometimes the journey is taken alone and sometimes with others. Does that change it for you? Remember to enjoy the journey!

MO

 

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Götzens October 2021: Reawaken Our Connectedness and our Life Energy by Peter Kennedy ~ (Oct 2021)

The second weekend in October 2021 I was in Götzens in Austria where for the first international Tai Chi group training in almost two years.  Students came from Austria and Switzerland. Teachers came from Austria, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and France. With Covid 19’s safety restrictions, it has not been possible to have in person group trainings.  This has led to a feeling of isolation for a lot of us.  So the theme of the tai chi weekend was to reawaken the feeling of connectedness and unity between us and others and to vitalize our life energy.

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Tai Chi Drama! Five Whips and Animals Everywhere! by Gabrielle Grunau, PhD ~ (Oct 2021)

When I traveled across country on September 15th, 2021, Hurricane Nicholas was giving my cross-country airplane quite a bit of turbulence. 

 

To pass time (and not be afraid) I put myself through all 37 positions of our tai chi rounds without moving a muscle (or at least I don’t think I moved a muscle). 

 

Here is the playful drama I created.

 

I am going on a journey through the jungle, which should be fun. 

 

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Tai Chi Chuan and the Olympics by Gerrie Sporken ~ (Oct 2021)

Over the summer I have enjoyed watching several sports in the Olympics. The Netherlands did very well, and we saw many TV interviews with the athletes. What struck me most was that when they gave an account of what it takes to perform their sport on the highest level, most said that it was largely in the mind! Surprising!

 

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Are you feeling burned out from the past year?

Are you a caretaker finding yourself stretched to your limits? It’s not only the kindest thing we can do but also the most practical, to nurture our own well-being and mental health in the midst of so many overwhelming pressures and stresses like the raging Covid pandemic. Self-care and staying centered need to be recognized as essential life skills. After all, If we are falling apart and crumbling from undue stress, how can we be of service to others?

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Reining in the Horse by Fran Snyder ~ (Aug 2021)

The tai chi self is an extraordinary experiment in living.  It perceives mind and body as one.  It recognizes that we are solid stuff and also immaterial.  To say it in tai chi terms, we are substantial and insubstantial.  These are not dualities but complements, and you can play with them in a tai chi way.  That is, you can let them interact and interlace, and allow them to set you in motion, as we say. Sometimes I am so enchanted by the workings of tai chi in my very bones that I become taller and lighter, and a sense of childlike happiness often fills me up.  

 

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Tai Chi in Twenty Voices* ~ (May 2021)

Morning light awakening to stillness.

It’s a moment of perpetual grace. We’ll be forever inside it for the rest of our lives.

 

The dantian grounds me, stabilizes me,

a keeper of expressions I never knew I possessed.

Relax. Breathe. Connect to heaven and earth. Move from my center. Breathe. Relax.

 

My friend likes tai chi because it is exercise that doesn’t hurt.

Single whip sinks down stretches my back, bringing my dantian closer to the earth.

 

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Walking and Tai Chi by Barbara Carlisle ~ (Apr 2021)

On 13 October 2020, I finished walking the South West Coast Path (SWCP), a journey of 630 miles that I’d started on 4 May 2016. The SWCP is the longest and finest of Britain’s National Trails, starting at Minehead in Somerset, going along the north coast of Somerset, Devon and Cornwall, around Lands End and along the south coast of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset, finishing at Poole. It took me 67 walking days, which averaged out at 9.4 miles per day. Not long distances, but quite enough for that sort of terrain where you are continually going up and down.

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